By: Marc Immanuel

Published on: 10 December 2016
Last updated on: 29 September 2017

.                                             A BRIEF HISTORY OF U.S. POLICING IN U.S.-JURISDICTION TERRITORY

The institution of slavery and the control of minorities… were two of the more formidable historic features of ‘American’ society shaping early policing.”

[The term ‘American’, in this context, denotes, specifically, United States American (US American), as pertaining to US society based within the borders of US-jurisdiction territory.]”

”Slave patrols and Night Watches, which later became modern police departments, were both designed to control the behaviors of minorities. For example, New England settlers appointed ‘Indian Constables’ [Indigenous police officers under European colonialist jurisdiction] to police ‘Native Americans’.” [The term ‘Native American’, in this context, refers to Indigenous Peoples of the Western Continent (”the Americas”, European naming)]…”

”The St. Louis Police were founded to protect residents from Native Americans in that frontier city, and many southern police departments began as slave patrols. In 1704, the colony of Carolina developed the nation’s first slave patrol. Slave patrols helped to maintain the economic order and to assist the wealthy landowners in recovering and punishing slaves who essentially were considered property.”



Read more at: “A Brief History of Slavery and the Origins of American Policing
Victor E. Kappeler, PhD., Associate Dean and Foundation Professor,
School of Justice Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky,
published on 7 January 2014



”In 1838, the city of Boston established the first official US police [law enforcement] force. By the 1880s, all major US cities had municipal police forces in place.”

”More than crime, modern police forces in the United States emerged as a response to ‘disorder’. What constitutes social and public order depends largely on who is defining those terms, and in the cities of 19th century ‘America’ [in this context, referring to US-occupied territory of the Western Continent] they were defined by the mercantile [big economic] interests, who through taxes and political influence supported the development of bureaucratic policing institutions. These economic interests had a greater interest in social control than crime control.”



Read more at:  “The History of Policing in the United States, Part 1”
Gary Potter, PhD., Professor,
School of Justice Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky,
published on 25 June 2013



”From the beginning, American [US] policing has been intimately tied not to the problem of crime, but to exigencies and demands of the American [US] political-economy. From the anti-immigrant bashing of early police forces, to the strike breaking of the later 1800s, to the massive corruption of the early 20th century, through professionalism, Taylorization, and now attempts at amelioration through community policing, the role of the police in the United States has been defined by economics and politics, not crime or crime control.”

”As we look to the 21st century, it now appears likely that a new emphasis on science and technology, particularly related to citizen surveillance; a new wave of militarization reflected in the spread of SWAT teams and other paramilitary squads; and a new emphasis on community pacification through community policing, are all destined to replay the failures of history as the policies of the future.”



Read more at: “The History of Policing in the United States, Part 6
Gary Potter, PhD, Professor,
School of Justice Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky,
published on 30 July 2013



SOURCES:

1. A Brief History of Slavery and the Origins of American Policing
Victor E. Kappeler, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Foundation Professor,
School of Justice Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky,
published on 7 January 2014

2. “The History of Policing in the United States”,
Gary Potter, Ph.D., Professor,
School of Justice Studies, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky

    Part 1, published 25 June 2013
Part 2, published 2 July 2013
Part 3, published 9 July 2013
Part 4, published 16 July 2013
Part 5, published 23 July 2013
Part 6, published 30 July 2013

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Home Page:

CRIMES OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT
From the Trail of Tears
to the Invasion of Iraq

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